Regulation

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Blog entry

Written by: Rich Gorman

The report on the US Pharmacopeia’s decision to continue relying on the blood of wild-caught horseshoe crabs for safety testing pharmaceuticals (

Written by: Rich Gorman

As part of a Wellcome Trust Secondment Fellowship with the RSPCA's Research Animals Department Dr R

Written by: Ally Palmer

Social scientists and historians have long observed that laboratory and field research are rather different (e.g., Gieryn, 2006; Kohler, 2002).

Written by: Ally Palmer

Can animals volunteer to participate in research? If so, what does volunteering look like, and what does it mean for animal welfare?

Written by: Gail Davies

Numbers can be a contentious issue in animal research.

Written by: Reuben Message

"How different does a fish really feel from one day to the next?" Zebrafish larvae become protected animals at the age of 5 days post fertilisation. At 4 days, they are not. Why is this?

Publications

Endotoxins are bacterial components that can cause systemic toxicity if they enter the mammalian blood stream.

The third issue of the AnNex Newsletter, December 2019

These notes summarise some key topics of conversation at the workshop 'Out of the lab, into the field: Exploring animal research at POLEs', held on the 30th Sept-1st Oct, 2019, at Keble College, Oxford. Please feel free to share these notes with your colleagues and wider networks.

This paper draws on ethnographic work with laboratory animal technologists to offer insights into the skills required to study human–animal relations and the role played by storytelling in negotiating the contested moral economies of animal research.

Vets play an important role in a wide variety of social contexts, including in ‘non-therapeutic’ roles, for example in facilitating the use of animals in sport or for food production. This paper focuses on a further non-therapeutic example, namely the role of the vet in laboratory animal research

This Nature correspondence note, written by Gail Davies, explains the principles of the UK’s Animals in Science Committee (ASC) review of the processes of harm–benefit analysis (HBA) carried out under the UK Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 (ASPA).

Events

What kinds of ethical and practical challenges do wildlife researchers face? How do these challenges compare with those faced by researchers working with laboratory animals?

Citizen science is a fundamental contributor to wildlife research in the UK but its regulation can be complex.

Announcements

This special issue aims to bring together work in the social science and humanities on the regulatory themes associated with animal research and knowledge production resulting from it, including but not limited to professionalisation, transparency